The Geneva Motor Show 2016: what can we look forward to?

The Geneva Motor Show is one of the The Geneva Motor Show overview: what can we look forward to? largest and most prestigious international motor shows in the world. In 2015 it saw premieres from all sorts of fantastic vehicles, from the relatively affordable and practical Ford Focus RS to luxury cars like the Porsche Cayman GT4 and the excessive Mercedes-Maybach S-Class Pullman

The 86th annual Geneva Motor Show takes place on 3-13 March 2016 in the exhibition halls of Palexpo. Once again there will be over 50 different automobile marques and plenty of exciting unveilings of new supercars. Here we detail what the show has in store for petrolheads around the world.

Luxury sports cars

The main draw every year is undoubtedly the range of brand new, exclusive sports cars premiered at the Geneva Motor Show. Leading the pack is the Bugatti Chiron, the Veyron’s successor, which will be officially unveiled at the show. It’s rumoured to be capable of 0 to 100 km/h in just over 2 seconds and is bound to be one of the most stylish cars on display.

Over two years since the Huracan Coupe emerged, it makes sense for the drop-top version to appear. The Lamborghini Huracan Spyder is expected to debut at the show too, although whether it will have a folding hard or soft top remains to be seen.


Various cars have also undergone facelifts that will make an appearance in Geneva. A facelifted Bentley Mulsanne is set to make its debut and, according to certain car industry updates, it will feature a larger front grille and redesigned headlights.

Porsche’s third-generation Boxster and second-generation Cayman are also in line to appear with their facelifts. Both will include a turbocharged four-cylinder engine in place of the old six-cylinder, naturally aspirated ones to boost performance and reduce fuel consumption. There may be a few aesthetic tweaks too, but nothing drastic.

Affordable motors

Along with all the extravagant luxury motors, plenty of new cars that have more down-to-earth prices can be found. The second-generation Mercedes Benz C-Class Cabriolet will be at the show, with a similar interior to other vehicles in the C-Class range, along with a soft-top folding roof. A sport model and plug-in hybrid are planned too.

Alfa Romeo’s Giulia models will also be debuting. Car industry updates claim they will be available in both rear- and all-wheel drives with six-speed manual and automatic transmissions to choose from. They are tipped to go on sale next autumn.


Various SUVs have been spotted undergoing tests ahead of being officially unveiled in March. The Audi Q2 (previously Q1) is one, which uses slimline LED headlight clusters with a sloping roofline that ends in a boot-mounted lip spoiler. A six-speed transmission is expected with three and four cylinder petrol and diesel engines.

Maserati Levante SUVs will also be on show. They’ve been heavily camouflaged in testing sessions so far, so little is known about the design just yet. A lot of factors are shared with the Quattroporte, however, so it is likely to be available with V6 and V8 engines, including a twin-turbo V8 version that delivers over 500 hp.

Energy-efficient vehicles

Electric and hybrid vehicles are gaining in popularity and plenty will be unveiled in Geneva. Nissan are set to preview their wireless charging system for electric vehicles, dubbed the fuel station of the future. Hyundai will present their first ever electric model, the Hyundai Ioniq. This will be available in electric, hybrid and plug-in hybrid models as they attempt to take on the dominating Toyota Prius.

There is a lot of excitement surrounding Lamborghini’s launch of a hybrid hypercar, the Centenario LP770-4. It has been based on the Aventador and will feature an all-wheel drive system to power the car. Rumoured performance of 0-100 km/h in 2.7 seconds and reaching speeds of up to 350 km/h are yet to be confirmed. A limited run of just 20 are due to be produced, so the Geneva Motor Show offers a rare opportunity to see one.


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